CONCURRENT SESSION 1: Constructing Innovation

Improving Safety for Pedestrians and Cyclists at Roadworks | Christian Bode, AJM-JV / Mott MacDonald & Melbourne Metro Rail Authority – VIC
 

Large projects such as the Melbourne Metro Tunnel Project are frequently subject to tight design constraints posed by stakeholders, space limitations, requirements to maintain existing traffic capacities and access. These restrictions can leave construction sites and road users competing for space, frequently resulting in adverse knock on effects in the treatment of pedestrians and cyclists (Vulnerable Road Users (VRUs)). This is especially true where construction sites are located in dense urban surroundings where States and Councils are increasingly seeking to encourage and promote pedestrian and cycle activity. Through early work for the Melbourne Metro Tunnel Project a gap was identified in the existing Australian regulations and guidelines for VRUs around worksites, along with onsite practices and provisions for VRUs. To address this, and ensure application of best practice to their work the Melbourne Metro Tunnel Project have researched the treatment of VRUs at roadworks in legislation, guidelines and in practice. As a result, a set of Guidelines has been produced that provides those responsible for traffic management plans, onsite practitioners and authorities a basis to determine whether VRUs have adequately been considered around sites.

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Advancing event traffic management in Queensland | Peter Bilton, Jon Douglas & Michael Pickerill Point8 – QLD
 

Much of the focus on improvements to traffic management industry in recent years has been focused on work sites, and significant steps have been taken by Queensland’s State road authority to deliver its objectives of safe and reliable travel through work sites for workers and the public.

Of interest to many traffic management practitioners and organisers in the event industry, is how safety and efficiency improvements can also be realised for events conducted on or near roads.

This paper presents recent efforts by the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads to provide additional tools to the industry to manage the risks and costs associated with the management of public traffic around events.

 

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Is traffic management in Australia under regulated? | Nigel Coates, City of Launceston – TAS
 

Comparing the practice and legal requirements for introducing traffic control in Australia and the UK.

In Australia it is fairly straightforward to introduce restrictions on traffic, both stationary and moving simply by implementing signage backed up by Australian Standards and Road Rules. In contrast the UK has a system of Traffic Regulation Orders (legal documents) that are required to be advertised and sealed before the signage can take effect. The Australian system, with less red tape, has its benefits but can result in less public scrutiny before restrictions are introduced and potentially opens road authorities to legal challenges if these are felt to be unreasonable. The paper will explore established practices and procedures in both countries and determine whether there are lessons to be learnt from both systems.

 

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CONCURRENT SESSION 5: Safety on our Streets

Designing 30km/h Neighbourhood Streets for WA | Tim Judd, GTA Consultants – WA
 

Neighbourhood streets play a vital role in making places liveable. Rather than seeing them as simply transport corridors for cars, they are important places for walking, cycling, social interactions and even playful exploration by local children. This paper argues that neighbourhood streets provide a valuable focus for a road safety intervention that is low cost and yet promises considerable benefits for road safety, neighbourhood amenity, public health and the community at large. While there is likely to be opposition to the introduction of lower speed limits in local neighbourhood streets, this paper provides evidence that such opposition is not justified and looks at what tools designers could use to achieve this outcome.

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Changing Streets for all Users – Safety Audit and Network Functionality (SANF) Process | Mike Smith, Stantec – NZ
 

The provision of new multi-modal transport facilities into existing road networks is a big challenge. With the devil being in the detail, the process of route selection, linkage of facilities and social and network impacts has a large impact on the viability of a route or area for suitable treatments. Many of the new facilities will be required to solve difficult situations, and require robust safety and urban design considerations to ensure that key elements have not been overlooked through the process.

Some solutions proposed in the design may be “first time” applications. In reviewing the then current “Best Practice”, it was identified that the process would struggle to keep up pace to the design and construction timeframes, and required a new way of thinking. The provision of new multi-modal transport facilities into existing road networks is a big challenge. With the devil being in the detail, the process of route selection, linkage of facilities and social and network impacts has a large impact on the viability of a route or area for suitable treatments.

 

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Safe System or Stalinist System? | Robert Morgan, Robert Morgan Traffic Engineering & Road Safety – VIC
 
The primary objective of this paper is to analyse the aims of the Safe System approach in detail and, through recent examples and a review of a book by eminent proponents of the Safe System, explain what the consequences are likely to be if it is followed through to its stated aim of no deaths or serious injuries on our roads. Other objectives include:
  • To illustrate the limits of the Safe System’s applicability
  • To explain the connection/distinction between Safe System and existing activities to improve safety (e.g. crash analysis and auditing)
  • To provide an alternative, more effective framework than the Safe System.

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HIRA – The Human Impact Route Assessment Tool | Matthew Bennett, Jen Thompson, Lora Colussi, Victoria Trumper, Dane Miokovic, Simon McLeish RMIT, VicRoads, Aurecon, MMRA, Fulton Hogan – VIC
 

Come along and meet HIRA - The Human Impact Route Assessment (HIRA) tool. HIRA is here to help you and your colleagues make better and more transparent decisions about the routes chosen for heavy vehicle construction traffic. This tool has been designed to promote the choice of heavy vehicle traffic routes that prioritise the safety of vulnerable road users and minimise the impact on the daily lives of communities during periods of construction related disruption. HIRA emerged from a unique inter-agency collaboration associated with the construction of Melbourne’s Metropolitan Rail Tunnel.

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CONCURRENT SESSION 9: Hostile Vehicle Mitigation - Panel Forum

Keeping people safe in public spaces | Douglas Tomkin, Designing Out Crime, University of Technology Sydney – NSW
 

Public safety in crowed places How likely is a deliberate act of violence involving a vehicle in Perth? Who should determine the risk and what if anything should be done - then take responsibility if something goes amiss? What preventive options are there? Sydney and Melbourne have made changes in response to vehicle attacks with significant impact on the look and feel of the CBD yet some question if safety has really been improved particularly during special events. This presentation will examine these questions and offer alternative approaches to what has become a worldwide concern.

Debunking the myths around HVM | Luke Pascoe, Arup – NSW
 

Recent unfortunate events around the world have drawn planners, owners, occupiers and designers into considering the risks posed by potential vehicle as weapon attacks. In this session we will share experiences from designing schemes to mitigate the risks posed by hostile vehicles, discuss the principles behind Hostile Vehicle Mitigation, draw evidence from assessments of recent incidents around the world and debunk some of the myths that are commonly encountered when considering hostile vehicle mitigation.

While often framed as a security problem, the provision of protective measures and vehicle security barriers is more often than not guided by engineers. Disciplines including civil and infrastructure engineers, pedestrian and traffic planners, and structural engineers often have a pivotal role to play in successfully protecting crowds from vehicle attacks. By being aware of the principles and what can and cannot be done, designers will be able to influence the design of sites that cater for all needs and not just shoe-horn bollards in as an afterthought.

 

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Vulnerability assessments and the need for HVM in the current threat environment | Craig Sheridan, Sheridan Consulting Group – NSW
 

The current threat environment continues to be complex, threatened by terrorism and a national and international safety concern, and as a consequence we all have a growing responsibility to play a part in the safety landscape for everyone.

Venue security and procedures also need to be heightened while still balanced with ensuring an optimal customer experience. Increased collaboration between all stakeholders, plus the hardening of venues themselves, has never been more urgent.

 

Crowded places remain a popular target for terrorists because of the ability to inflict maximum impact and casualties, a large number of witnesses and a way for terrorism to gain speedy, widespread publicity.

 

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CONCURRENT SESSION 13: Innovative Technology - Interactive Panel Forum

STREAMS Gateway – Ubiquitous access to operational road data | David Apelt, Transmax – VIC
 

Transmax is a full-service Intelligent Transport System (ITS) solutions provider that develops, supports and deploys the international-award winning ITS platform, STREAMS®. STREAMS® has a proven track record in Australia of delivering control to more than 13 traffic management centres managing more than 110,000km of roads and 50,000 ITS devices and 2000 intersections. Transmax is an unlisted Australian company wholly owned by the Queensland Government Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR) and has a well-established reputation as an experienced, full service ITS provider.

Transmax recognises that data is the life-blood of the road operations, management, planning and modelling industry. Data feeds information, that feeds knowledge that in turn feeds wisdom. Without the data, informed decisions at any level cannot be made.

 

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Application of Drone Technology and Video Processing in Traffic Engineering | Mohammad Rasouli, Transcore – WA
 

Drone technology has been used in different fields and for different purposes. Application of Drone or unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) in traffic and transport engineering has become increasingly popular over the years. Traffic monitoring from UAVs overcomes the limitations of traditional methods of traffic data collection due to its ability to cover large areas, monitoring the traffic flow and providing the opportunity to undertake traffic analysis using advanced video processing tools and extract the key traffic parameters such as classified traffic flow, speed, acceleration, saturation flow , gap time and follow up time and even origin-destination matrix for small sites. The combination of drone technology for data collection and advanced video processing tool would assist traffic engineers and modelers to calibrate their models with the accurate traffic parameters. A generic and robust methodology for visual detection and tracking the road vehicles from aerial video sequences and developing a fully autonomous UAV system for traffic monitoring and analysis would outperform the traditional technologies (manual traffic counts, inductive loop detectors, static videos, radar, ultrasound technologies etc.).

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Road Safety infrastructure for City, Country and Remote areas | David Goedheer & Josie Goedheer, Traffic Calming Australia – VIC
 

Traffic Calming Australia , have been members of the AIPTM since 2009 and shares the vision of the AITPM.

TCA understands the difficulties traffic engineers face in the delivery of safe streets , and the delivery of travel modes such as cycling which are subject to variances of opinions , and political considerations .

Typically a traffic engineers vision gets bogged down by opposing opinions, and often change is only facilitated by things such as a fatality.

TCA aims to provide traffic calming solutions which can provide the flexibility to the traffic engineer to implement , trial , and adjust to suit latm projects , such as traffic calming , speed cushions, roundabouts , Copenhagen and separated cycle ways ,in a cost effective , and with a rapid response without the burden of a “one shot “ implementation .

 

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Implementation of Acti-bumps | Shannon Savage, Curtin University – WA
 

The tech company Edeva from Sweden has developed a dynamic speed bump, called the Actibump, that has proven its efficiency through years of use in Sweden. The Actibump product has turned some heads in the international traffic safety business and will now be exported to Australia. Curtin University in Perth have ordered two Actibump systems for installation on their campus in order to provide accessibility at a safe speed.

The dynamic speed bumps will be installed at Curtin University in December 2017 with data being collected before and after installation.

 

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CONCURRENT SESSION 17: ITS

A Smarter Town Centre – Wollongong City Integrated Parking Guidance System | Andrew Morse, PTC Consultants – NSW
 

Smart cities use information and communication technologies to improve their operational efficiency and improve residents’ quality of life. They can involve any area of the city, such as energy, health, buildings, transportation and parking. In that context, smart parking initiatives that go beyond individual car parks can assist in solving two major issues for growing cities: reducing traffic congestion and balancing parking demand and supply. Town centre Parking Guidance Systems (PGS) can eliminate the need to build more car parks by optimising the use of current parking assets. It also prevents unnecessary travel time for drivers in their search for available parking spaces.

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The devil is in the details | David Brown, Driven Media – NSW
 

The advent of autonomous vehicles, vehicle sharing and information sharing has produced a wave of predictions (if not fantasies) on how this may lead to a better world via motoring utopia.

The focus has been on how the new technology can operate in relatively ideal situations. But new technology will need different infrastructure be it how we use corridors but also, critically, on how we apply the most appropriate traffic engineering management.

Without this input and application, we could end up with many unintended consequences and an even more inefficient system.

 

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CONCURRENT SESSION 21: Network Operations

Loading docks and building servicing – an evidence based approach | Josh Milston, Arup – NSW
 

The Sydney CBD is currently undergoing major transformation through a number of significant developments, many of which are multi-billion dollar developments. As the city grows, and in particular as new major developments are completed, demand for servicing in the city will increase.

In this context, the provision of suitably sized and functional off-street loading areas (i.e. loading docks) are important to meet the growing needs of the city and reduce demands for on-street loading.

 

The design of off-street loading facilities, particularly the number of service bays required to accommodate the expected level of demand, is frequently a source of conjecture between engineering professionals, architects/designers, property managers and consent authorities. Often the loading dock provision is driven by commercial priorities in the lack of strong evidence to suggest a certain number of loading bays are required based on the floor space of the building.

 

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Area and Route Management | Chris Scholte, Main Roads – WA
 

This paper references the work by Main Roads Western Australia in managing performance of the 29 routes of the metropolitan state road network in Perth. Over the past three years, Main Roads has focused on development of capabilities in Network Operations directorate to improve traffic performance in Perth through performance reporting, traffic modelling, data analysis, real-time operations, signal optimisation and project delivery. As a focal point responsible for maintaining operational performance of road assets in Perth’s metropolitan area, and to coordinate the work between different teams, the organisational model of Area and Route Management has been adopted to deliver data-driven solutions that meet Perth’s congestion concerns.

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Business Intelligence for Network Performance Operations | David Rey Argote, Main Roads – WA
 

Main Roads Western Australia (MRWA) faces significant operational challenges managing traffic on Perth's metropolitan state road network. Intelligent use of data is increasingly needed to assist operations and optimise the performance of traffic and transport networks. To this end MRWA is managing more data than ever before, collected from internal system (SCATS, VDS, Bluetooth) as well as data feeds sourced from external providers (Intelematics, TomTom, Waze). Managing the implementation of solutions and processes to glean intelligence and operational insights from these data sources is a significant challenge. This paper will discuss some of the Business Intelligence (BI) tools, techniques and visualisations being used by MRWA’s Operational Analysis Team to convert this data into information.

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